The 5 Things That Our Top 100 Challenges Have In Common

By Greg Audino

One of the best ways that content creators using Vibely keep their followers engaged is by designing challenges for them. While each of these challenges is unique, after seeing tens of thousands of them be performed, we decided to look at the 100 most successful challenges ever run on our platform and identify what they have in common. Here are the 5 traits they all share:

  1. The Audience Has Specific, Measurable Instructions

Vague doesn’t work, and the creators behind our top 100 challenges know that. Always be clear in what you’re asking your community to do. For example, if you’re issuing a reading challenge, do not say, “Get some reading done this weekend!” More direct instructions might sound like:

  • Read for 20 minutes
  • Read 2 chapters
  • Read for 30 minutes right before bed
  • Read 1 autobiography within the next 7 days
  1. The Audience is Told How the Challenge Will Benefit Them

The more people know how they’ll be rewarded for participating, the more likely they are to believe in the process. Think about your audience’s pain points, and when you’re giving them a challenge, be very clear about what they’re getting out of it. It’s particularly effective to do this right away, like in the challenge’s title. Here are some examples:

  • Shoot 50 Soccer Balls A Day For Better Accuracy
  • Donate 30 Articles of Clothing For Less Clutter in Your Bedroom
  • Meditate 20 Minutes Before Work For a Less Stressful Work Day

In addition to the audience’s goals, we’ve found that prizes are also a great reward to keep people engaged. When possible, include prizes in your challenges such as gift cards, shoutouts, free coaching calls with you, etc.

  1. The Audience is Asked to Show Their Results in a Quick Way

We wouldn’t know how potent challenges were if the people participating didn’t share their results. Make sure you encourage your followers to report back about what they accomplished, but don’t inconvenience them. The smartest content creators respect their followers’ time and attention by asking them to show their results with words like:

  • Write at least a sentence or two about what you learned
  • Post an emoji that shows how you’re feeling after finishing the challenge
  • Upload a selfie of you in the gym after your workout is complete

Creators should also follow this rule! Keep your challenges brief. 3-4 sentences or a 15-30 second video describing the rules should be the target.

  1. The Audience is Told to Engage With One Another

If there’s one way to get people to challenge themselves, it’s by making sure others are doing it with them. Encourage your followers to interact with one another so that everyone feels supported and like part of a community. Some of the language we saw in our top 100 challenges sounded like:

  • “Be sure to show some love on other people’s entries”
  • “Leave a comment on someone else’s post that inspired you”
  1. The Audience is Making Progress, Not Just Keeping Busy

Your followers are there to learn from you and gain value, and busy work is simply not an option with the full schedules we all have. Similar to trait #2 from this list, when creating a challenge, it’s really important to think about how to help your audience achieve a common goal. Even the best instructors will find it difficult to make all challenges so driven, but try to do this whenever possible.

Let’s look at good examples of how this might show up in an online finance community:

Challenges that do not help the audience make progress:

  • Show Us a Picture of Some Foreign Currency That You Have
  • Tell Us What Your First Job Was
  • When Did You First Decide You Wanted to Save Money?

Challenges that do help the audience make progress:

  • Start a Side Hustle This Month
  • Start Tracking Every Dollar Earned and Spent in an Excel Sheet
  • Put Away No Less Than $500 Each Month

Want more tips on how to keep your community engaged and create awesome challenges? Be sure to check out this post from our FAQ page!

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